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Preventing vandalism at the job site with machine security covers

Supplier: Noise Control Engineering
04 November, 2013

A safe workplace is a productive and profitable workplace.

In almost any work environment, whatever the industry may be, business owners acknowledge the value of cultivating a culture of safety. After all, accidents can result in disruption of work, loss of productivity, unmet deadlines, loss of income, or worse, even lawsuits. This is why it is crucial for business owners, supervisors and managers, and most importantly, staff members, to understand their roles in keeping the workplace safe. Safety can range from making proper use of equipment to using the appropriate clothing and even vigilance.

However, while many mining and construction companies put a premium on safety in their workplaces, they may be under threat from outsiders with the intent to steal or vandalise equipment. If it is crucial to keep the construction site secure, it is equally important to keep it safe from external threats.

For earthmoving machinery and similar equipment, companies can utilise machine security covers. Generally, while these heavy machines can withstand the mischievous antics of vandals, these machines do have one Achilles heel - the driver's compartment. If there is no one patrolling the job site during night time or if the machinery cannot be moved to a more secure area, the next logical step business owners can take is to use machine security covers.

Vandal covers can be installed to prevent the entry of vandals into the compartment as well as prevent them from tampering with the controls. Vandal guards can also protect the glass portion of the compartment against rocks and objects thrown against it.

Vandal guards come in a variety of materials including aluminium, punched mesh, woven mesh, welded mesh, flat bar, solid steel and plastic. They can be installed onto the compartment in a variety of ways including padlockable over-centre catches.

The last thing that you want to see upon reporting to work first thing in the morning is your machinery tampered with and broken down. Not only can this cost you money, but more importantly, it can disrupt the flow of work.