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Transport job index shows end-of-year decline

16 January, 2015

The January edition of Labourforce Job Index showed a decline for hiring intentions toward the end of 2014 for the transport and logistics industry, however heading into the new year industry analysts expect things to pick up.

"The transport logistics and supply chain employment market experienced its first month of decline since June 2014, with the Labourforce Job Index falling 4.6 per cent to 114.09," Paul McLeay, spokesperson for Labourforce, said.

"This is largely attributable to seasonal factors.

"Over the past 12 months demand has risen 22.4 per cent – well above the national norm – so December's decline is a short-term trend."

"We have seen a dip in transport jobs (and) a rise in manufacturing jobs due to the Aussie dollar, and in contrast a 12 per cent decline in retail jobs in the last month of our Job Index."

Temporary and contract job advertisements fell 2.7 per cent in December, however the temporary market has grown in 10 out of the last 12 months, 40.2 per cent in total over the last year.

McLeay said some of the recent growth was attributable to short-term hires for the Christmas period, and some softening should be expected in early 2015.

Although demand for permanent staff fell 5.3 per cent, the market remained strong throughout 2014.

In summary…

  • Demand for transport, logistics and supply chain staff fell 4.6% in December, the first fall since June
  • The Labourforce Impex Job Index sits at 114.09, so still a very strong market
  • Permanent demand fell 5.3%, temp and contract 2.7% – but much of this is seasonal
  • Queensland and WA fell substantially in December. Both have fared well in 2014 despite weakness in the mining and resources sector
  • Demand for TLSC management rose 2.8% in December,29.8% over twelve months driven by demand for senior professionals with export experience
  • Manufacturers actively hiring, up 10.2% in December alone, spurred on by more favourable terms of trade

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